Crown Nwachukwu

Crown Nwachukwu is an Agricultural Economist and the founder of D’inspirer. Her experience as a staff of one of the leading financial institutions in Africa, has given her a broad base on work, interpersonal relationship, skills and character. As an ardent lover of books, she shares her non-working times to write articles that focus on people inspired experiences, research based knowledge, and motivational insights for men and women. Her articles feature on other sites like African scholars blog.com. Smart, phenomenal and audacious with a  crush for romance dramas; favourite Korean  ( smiles), you will love to share some thoughts with this lady. To interact and increase your altitude in life and career, visit her blog at www.D’inspirer.com

Her Mission Statement- ” I run straight to the goal with purpose in every step, doing the eternal and timeless purpose of God in a contemporary and timely generation”.

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WHY SHE LOVES WRITING

Aristotle’s definition of happiness is ‘’deploying your full force along the lines of excellence. Being a writer helps me do exactly that says Lady Crown. Being able to give words to a completely new idea or thought is like finding a rare orchid in a dark wood. Good stories connect people together. There’s a reason book clubs are popular and it’s not just that people want to have motivation to actually read stuff on their wish list. It’s that people want to have an excuse to get together, socialize and talk about common interest. Sharing makes you feel warm and fuzzy inside .

The psychiatrist Victor Frankyl posited that ‘’the main search of mankind is not happiness or pleasure but meaning. Life is never made unbearable by circumstances but only by lack of meaning and purpose,’’ he wrote in Man’s Search for Meaning. Writers are uniquely gifted to find meaning for themselves and to help others find theirs too. We write to bring meaning to the world. ‘’Finally, we write to be fully aware’’ she added.Writing draws us into the moment. We see blades of grass, hear the miniscule chip of the morning cricket, watch the shade travel from one edge of the yard to the other, seemingly for the first time.